DIAGNOSTICS

Valve Test

Valves either reverse the flow (Directional Valves, Down Valves or Up Valves), lock the flow (Locking Valve), or control the speed of the flow (Flow Control Valves).

To determine the which valve, see the Powerpack Components page.

SunLift Valve Tests

2002 to Present
SunLift valves either reverse the flow (Directional Valves, Down Valves or Up Valves) or control the speed of the flow (Flow Control Valves). A SunLift has a coil operated Up Valve, a coil operated Down Valve, and a Flow Control valve that controls the downward speed

To identify a valve, see the Powerpack Components page.


Down or Up Valve Test(No access to Pressure Gauges)

If the lift operates in on direction, but not the other, it could be a coil not getting power, a bad coil, or a sticky valve. Before performing valve test, check the coil.

  1. Check if valve is shifting
    1. Remove white trip wire from start solenoid
    2. Push up and listen for valve “Click” indicating up valve is shifting
      1. If you do not hear a “click” on the up valve, the valve is sticking
    3. Push down and listen for valve “Click” indicating down valve is shifting
      1. If you do not hear a “click” on the down valve, the valve is sticking
  2. Swap out sticking valves
  3. Run Lift to see if problem continues
NOTES:

If you don’t have a replacement valve to try, you can attempt to free the valve if it is stuck. While the valves are out, depress the button at the end of the bottom of the valve to manually move the valve about 1/8″ in and out.


Down or Up Valve Test (In line Pressure Gauges)

  1. Check if valve is shifting
    1. Attach In Line Pressure Gauges to power unit and hoses
    2. Press Up and pressure should build on lower gauge (up QD)
    3. Press Down and pressure should build on upper gauge (down QD)
    4. If pressure does not change from Up Gauge to Down Gauge a valve is not shifting
      1. If pressure isn’t building on Down Gauge replace down valve
      2. If pressure isn’t building on Up Gauge replace up valve
  2. Run Lift to see if problem continues
NOTES:

If you don’t have a replacement valve to try, you can attempt to free the valve if it is stuck. While the valves are out, depress the button at the end of the bottom of the valve to manually move the valve about 1/8″ in and out.

Pre-2002 SunLifts
These powerpacks use a Spool Valve that is moved left and right by an Up Coil and a Down Coil. Particulates can make the spool valve sticky, and cause the lift not to go up or down. The Spool Valve can be manually shifted by inserting a nail-sized object in the end of the valve. It is important to diagnose if the problem is caused by a sticky spool valve, or a weak coil.

To identify a valve, see the Powerpack picture page.


Valve Tests

  1. Check the coils to make sure they are getting properly magnatized when activated. Swap the two coils if you suspect a weak coil and see if the problem reverses.
  2. Verify the battery is ok.
  3. If the lift will not go down, verify the ‘Speed Control’ is not closed off too much, by opening the valve 2 turns (counter-clockwise).
  4. Verify all the QD’s are completely connected. (changing a battery can sometimes accidentally disconnect the down QD).
  5. Manually override the valves: The up coil is on the right, and the down coil is on the left. The valves are under the coils. If the lift does not move in one or both directions, manually override the valve by firmly pressing the button on the end of the suspected valve using a nail-sized object while operating the lift in that direction. If the lift now begins to operate, then it is likely that a particulate is causing the Spool valve to be sticky. In this case, clean the spool valve.


FloatLift Valve Tests

Fall 2004 to present
Valves either reverse the flow (Directional Valves, Down Valves or Up Valves), lock the flow (Locking Valve, and Check valve), or control the speed of the flow (Flow Control Valves).

To identify a valve, see the Powerpack Components page.


FL6012 Valves Fall 2004 to Present

  • 2 Up Valves (for port float and starboard float) valve shifts to go down
  • 2 Flow Control Orifices
  • 2 PO Check Valves (for side 1 and 2). Out of all these valves, we have never had a problem with any valves, except for the Down Valves.


Up Valve Test

If one side of a FloatLift will not go down, it could be a sticky valve, a bad coil, a non-grounded coil, a loose (or bad) QD connection or no power getting to the coil. Before performing the down valve test, test that the coils are operating.

  1. Put the lift in the up or down position (without the boat)
  2. Switch the #1 and #2 Down Valves. While the valves are out, depress the button at the end of the bottom of the valve to manually move the valve about 1/8″ in and out.
  3. Run Lift
  4. If the problem reverses, then replace the down valve that operates the bad side.


Locking Valve test

We have not experienced a problem with the locking valve. However, it could be a cause of why both sides of the lift will not go down. Before checking this valve, check the coil that operates it, check that the QD’s are tight, the battery is charged, and the motor is running. If you suspect this valve is sticky, remove it and push the button at the bottom of the valve to clean it out. If you want to hear it operate, remove the wires to the Starter Solenoid and Down valves and listen for the valve to click when pressing the Down or Up button. If it does not click if the coil is functioning, then maybe you found the first bad Locking Valve.

Flow Control Orifice Test

If one of the sides of the FloatLift is going down at a different speed than the other, you may have a contaminant in one the Flow Control Orifices. To view removal of orifice click here. We have never replaced a bad Flow Control valve.


Check Valve Test

The PO Check Valve keeps the lift from drifting down, unless the down line is pressurized. A symptom of a bad check valve is the lift drifting down. If you suspect a bad check valve, try to swap the #1 and #2 valves and see if the problem reverses.

2003 to Fall 2004
Valves either reverse the flow (Directional Valves, Down Valves or Up Valves), lock the flow (Locking Valve, and Check valve), or control the speed of the flow (Flow Control Valves).

To identify a valve, see the Powerpack Components page.

FL6012 Valves 2003 to 2004

  • 2 Down Valves (for port float and starboard float) valve shifts to go down
  • 2 Flow Control Valves (for side 1 and 2)
  • 2 PO Check Valves (for side 1 and 2). Out of all these valves, we have never had a problem with any valves, except for the Down Valves.


Down Valve Test

If one side of a FloatLift will not go down, it could be a sticky valve, a bad coil, a non-grounded coil, a loose (or bad) QD connection or no power getting to the coil. Before performing the down valve test, test that the coils are operating.

  1. Put the lift in the up or down position (without the boat)
  2. Switch the #1 and #2 Down Valves. While the valves are out, depress the button at the end of the bottom of the valve to manually move the valve about 1/8″ in and out.
  3. Run Lift
  4. If the problem reverses, then replace the down valve that operates the bad side.


Flow Control Valve Test

If one of the sides of the FloatLift is going down at a different speed than the other, you may have a contaminant in one the Flow Control Valves. Simply switch the # 1 and #2 Flow control valves to see if the problem reverses. If it does, then try cleaning it out before replacing. Make sure both Flow Control valves have the same flow rating written on the side of the nut. We have never replaced a bad Flow Control valve.

If the lift is an early FL6 (pre mid-2003), and the customer complains the lift is too slow, replace the .41 FC’s with the current .60 FC’s at no charge except labor.

PO Check Valve Test

The PO Check Valve keeps the lift from drifting down, unless the down line is pressurized. We have never had a problem with one of these valves, but if you suspect it, try to swap the #1 and #2 valves and see if the problem reverses.

2002 to 2003
Valves either reverse the flow (Directional Valves, Down Valves or Up Valves), lock the flow (Locking Valve, and Check valve), or control the speed of the flow (Flow Control Valves).

To identify a valve, see the Powerpack Components page.

FL6012 Valves 2002 to 2003

  • 2 Down Valves (for port float and starboard float) valve shifts to go down
  • Locking Valve that locks both sides when not operating
  • 2 Flow Control Valves (for side 1 and 2)
  • 2 PO Check Valves (for side 1 and 2). Out of all these valves, we have never had a problem with any valves, except for the Down Valves.


Down Valve Test

If one side of a FloatLift will not go down, it could be a sticky valve, a bad coil, a non-grounded coil, a loose (or bad) QD connection or no power getting to the coil. Before performing the down valve test, test that the coils are operating.

  1. Put the lift in the up or down position (without the boat)
  2. Switch the #1 and #2 Down Valves. While the valves are out, depress the button at the end of the bottom of the valve to manually move the valve about 1/8″ in and out.
  3. Run Lift
  4. If the problem reverses, then replace the down valve that operates the bad side.


Locking Valve Test

We have not experienced a problem with the locking valve. However, it could be a cause of why both sides of the lift will not go down. Before checking this valve, check the coil that operates it, check that the QD’s are tight, the battery is charged, and the motor is running. If you suspect this valve is sticky, remove it and push the button at the bottom of the valve to clean it out. If you want to hear it operate, remove the wires to the Starter Solenoid and Down valves and listen for the valve to click when pressing the Down or Up button. If it does not click if the coil is functioning, then maybe you found the first bad Locking Valve.

Flow Control Valve Test

If one of the sides of the FloatLift is going down at a different speed than the other, you may have a contaminant in one the Flow Control Valves. Simply switch the # 1 and #2 Flow control valves to see if the problem reverses. If it does, then try cleaning it out before replacing. Make sure both Flow Control valves have the same flow rating written on the side of the nut. We have never replaced a bad Flow Control valve.

If the lift is an early FL6 (pre mid-2003), and the customer complains the lift is too slow, replace the .41 FC’s with the current .60 FC’s at no charge except labor.

PO Check Valve Test

The PO Check Valve keeps the lift from drifting down, unless the down line is pressurized. We have never had a problem with one of these valves, but if you suspect it, try to swap the #1 and #2 valves and see if the problem reverses.